Views of the Monkeynut

by   Peter R. Lloyd-Davies


FAMILY STUFF HIKING TRIPS MISC MUSINGS ARCHIVES
Road trip in Europe, 1963 New Hampshire 1998 On Kittens and Cuckoos 2003
Europe 1997 New Hampshire 1999 On the Theater 2004
Disney 2000 New Hampshire 2000 My Uncle Edward 2005
Europe 2000 Seattle 2000 My War Journal 2006
Southwest 2001 New Hampshire 2001 The Current Unpleasantness, 2009 2007
Cape Cod 2002 Seattle 2002 More cat thoughts, 2014 2008
Opila reunion 2002 New Hampshire 2003 Why I can't afford to run for office, 2014 2009
Christmas 2002 Toni in Alaska, July 2008 Socialism in South America 2010
Honk! - February 2003 The Geezers ride again, 2009 Thoughts on immigration 2011
July 4 2003 2012
Maine, August 2003 2013
Lake Winnipesauke, 2004 2014
Russell is 90, Sept 2004 2015
Europe, August 2005 2016
A mighty wind, 2006
Turkey, 2007
Xmas 2007 pictures
Mike's graduation, June 2008
Puerto Rico, January 2011
In and around Austin, 2011
Romping with the dinosaurs, 2012
Trip to Southeast Asia, 2012
We belatedly celebrate our arrival in Texas
Kittens!
Off to New Mexico in August, 2013
Big Bend National Park, April, 2014
Antonia in Cameroon, 2014
Europe, 2015
Skydiving, 2016
Our trip to Italy in June, 2016
Lynch reunion in Sugarland Texas, 2016
To New York to see Hamilton, May 2017

Views of the Monkeynut presents a vivid multimedia adventure unfolding the splendor of the Lloyd-Davies and Lynch atomic family, featuring, as the nucleus, Peter and Louise; as the electrons, Madeleine and Antonia. Discover the agonies and ecstacies of their latest travels, or study the history of their adventures from conception to the present through a vast archive of photographs, scientific facts, questionable rumor, text, graphics and videos.


Peter

Louise

Madeleine

Antonia

New from the Monkeynut, May 2017. Thanks to the efforts of Madeleine, the four of us had tickets for Hamilton on Broadway. Louise and I turned this into a week-long trip to tourist around the City and see friends; Antonia was only able to make it for four days. The show was great, the weather in New York was hot so that we Texans did not feel out of place, and we were able to spend time with some of our good New York friends.

We also got to see Madeleine performing in an improv show. This is her latest passion and she is taking a series of classes in it. The show marked the end of one the classes and was hilarious.

More on our trip here.

New from the Monkeynut, March 2017. Gotta tell the world - or at least the infinitessimally small portion of the world that reads my posts on this site - about a book! Actually three books. I can't remember how I found out about Cixin Liu, but he was the first Chinese (as in living in China) science fiction author I heard of. He had written a large sci-fi novel which was translated into English and called "The Three-Body Problem". The title refers to the the principles of motion of three celestial bodies entangled by gravity, like the earth, the moon and the sun. Newton had hoped that a nice tidy set of equations could be derived to describe this motion but eventually it was determined that, with a few special exceptions, no such equations can be derived. Instead, the motion of three bodies tends to be chaotic. Systems with binary stars are reasonably predictable, but Cixin Liu imagines what a solar system would be like if it had three suns, moving chaotically around each other. Life on a planet in this system would suck big time, with occasional periods of nice life-supporting weather abruptly ending and being replaced by periods of intense heat or cold.

After I finished this book, I discovered that it was the first one in a trilogy. Louise obligingly bought me the whole set and I feasted on them almost nonstop. (Over 2,000 pages in the set.) Although I'd love to explain in absurd detail all the nuances of his writing and the breathtaking twists of his stories, I feel that it would be more disciplined of me just to say that these are some awesome books and you should read them. And just a wee foretaste of this - Cixin Liu has a persuasive answer to Fermi's paradox, along with all kinds of other mind benders.


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